9th January 2019

I know hundreds of borderline cases of consumerism in search of a North Star to guide their sails towards change, teetering between utopia and realism or, if you prefer, between enthusiasm and fear.

Have you noticed that, often, Elementary Farming is associated with the definition of “Vegetable Garden Civilisation”? Well, this is my way of bringing together two extremes: the vegetable garden as an achievable emblem of self-sufficiency and civilisation as the utopia of a better world. The search for self-sufficiency goes far beyond growing a vegetable garden. It embraces building your home, producing energy, taking care of yourself, transforming products, craftsmanship in the most varied of industries, and so on and so forth. And this is how it comes together: in my opinion, civilisation identifies with the highly social place where “know-how” inextricably amalgamates with the individual (and, of course, also the ecological) existential dimension. Beyond the definitions, it is a matter of going into the operational details, and this is the problem for those who are “on the fence”. As far as I’m concerned (and now there are many of us who feel the same), with Elementary Farming, I have identified the right way to achieve true food self-sufficiency for social change, as it doesn’t require initial or ongoing investments, it isn’t complicated or tiring, and it produces a great deal. But above all, earth improves when it is cultivated, despite not requiring any reintegration of external nutritional substances. This is another likeness of a perfect civilisation, where the hoarding of corporatism and “professionalism” is abolished, and where experience and passion – just like food – are accessible to everyone… in every field!

9th January 2019

Gian Carlo Cappello

Gian-Carlo-Cappello